Edison Research Conducts First Ever “Share of Ear” Measurement For All Forms Of Online And Offline Audio

Despite a constantly changing audio landscape, broadcast radio controls more than half of the more than four hours a day that Americans spend with all sources of audio. But the audio space is vibrant and changing – and newer sources of audio, from Internet-only services like Pandora and Spotify, to Satellite Radio, and even TV music channels like Music Choice now account for nearly a quarter of all listening.

Those are just a few of the findings from Share of Ear, the groundbreaking new syndicated study from Edison Research that provides the first consistent measurement of all audio consumption, including AM/FM radio stations, online radio stations, podcasts and even listeners’ own music collections.

Edison’s Share of Ear results are from a nationally representative sample of 2,096 Americans ages 13+ who completed a 24-hour audio listening diary during May 2014. The study reveals that Americans spend an average of 4 hours and 5 minutes each day consuming audio, and more than 52% of that time goes to broadcast radio on all its various platforms. But other sources of pre-programmed audio now control 26% of listening time, while listening to one’s own music collection receives more than 20% “share of ear.”

Share of Ear

Share Of Ear (Click To Enlarge)

The Edison Research Share of Ear study allows users to look at audio usage across many parameters, such as location of listening, the devices on which audio is consumed, listening by time of day, the type of audio content (music, news, sports, or talk/personalities), and even across individual brands within the Online Radio space.

“Edison’s Share of Ear study is a response to the many requests from all corners of the audio industry and investment community for ‘total share of everything’ figures that did not previously exist,” says Edison President Larry Rosin. “Edison reported last September that America is in a ‘golden age of audio consumption.’ Seeing that Americans spend roughly a fourth of their waking day listening to some sort of audio confirms it.”

Share of Ear is being made available on a subscription basis to all interested parties, including broadcasters, audio suppliers, agencies and advertisers, the investment community, academicians, and the music business. The proprietary client-only information will contain extensive rankings of the most-listened-to audio suppliers, comprehensive demographic information, and robust information on listening location – home, in-car, and office – that has previously been unavailable.

For further information, call us at 908-707-4707 or use our contact form, here.

How the Study was Conducted:

Edison Research conducted a nationally representative study of 2,096 Americans ages 13+ to measure their time spent listening to audio sources. Respondents completed a 24-hour diary of their audio listening on an assigned day. Diaries were completed both online and by-mail using a paper diary. Online diaries were completed May 14, 2014-May 20, 2014 and diaries by-mail were completed May 20, 2014-May 27, 2014. Diaries were completed in both English and Spanish.

About Edison Research

Edison Research conducts survey research and provides strategic information to a broad array of clients, including Activision, AMC Theatres, Disney, Dolby Laboratories, Google, Gulf News, the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau, Pandora, Samsung, Siemens, Sony, St. Jude Children’s Hospital, Time Warner and Yahoo. Edison Research works with many of the largest American radio ownership groups, including Bonneville, Emmis, Entercom, CBS Radio and Radio One. Another specialty for Edison is its work for media companies throughout the world, conducting research in North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Edison Research is the sole provider of election exit poll data for the National Election Pool comprised of ABC, CBS, CNN, FOX, NBC and the Associated Press. Edison is also the leading provider of consumer exit polling and has conducted face-to-face research in almost every imaginable venue.

2 replies
  1. KAM
    KAM says:

    How was YouTube included within this study? Is it accounted for in “other”? or “internet radio”? or was it not included? It might have a significant impact on the numbers.

    Reply
    • Tom Webster
      Tom Webster says:

      Hi, Keith. This study did indeed measure YouTube, and that data is included in the full subscriber-only report. For this particular graph, we are only including audio-only sources, but we have data that does indeed fold YouTube in.

      Reply

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