Super Listeners 2020 with Podcast One and Ad Results Media — save the date

You are invited to join us on Tuesday, December 8, 2 PM EDT as we debut the second annual Super Listeners study from Podcast One, Ad Results Media, and Edison Research.

Podcast One CEO Peter Morris, Ad Results Media CEO Marshall Williams, and Edison Research SVP Tom Webster will walk attendees through an exclusive look at those who spend the most time listening to podcasts, their attitudes towards podcast advertising, and how they view podcasting in the greater media landscape.

Last year we unveiled a look at who podcast “super listeners” are — they listen to five or more hours of podcasts weekly and are the people most likely to hear podcasting ads and to have an opinion about them.

This year’s in-depth analysis of podcast super listeners from Podcast One, Ad Results Media, and Edison Research further explores the relationship between super listeners and podcast advertising with specific insights on the following:

• How super listeners feel about the number of ads in podcasts and the length of ad breaks
• Attitudes about host-read ads v. pre-recorded ads v. sponsorships
• How podcast advertising affects intent to purchase and other brand fit measures
• Ad-skipping behavior

…and many more insights from this annual flagship study of podcasting’s best customers. We hope you will join us!

Click here to register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_sWkROignRimuX5-VUgtIfA

NEP & EDISON RESEARCH TO ONCE AGAIN CONDUCT EXIT POLL OF RECORD

NEP and Edison Research will expand in-person early voting interviews and implement Covid-19-related protocols to maintain health and safety.

With record numbers of Americans expected to vote before Election Day, the exit poll of record, conducted by Edison Research on behalf of ABC News, CBS News, CNN and NBC News, will begin interviewing voters at early voting locations around the country on October 13.

“More Americans are expected to vote before Election Day this year than any other election in history, and the member networks of the National Election Pool (NEP) and Edison Research have developed innovative new techniques to account for that in our long-standing exit poll,” said Joe Lenski, co-founder and Executive Vice President of Edison Research.

The NEP’s exit poll is the only survey that will be released on election night that represents the views and opinions of actual voters interviewed as they cast their ballots all across the country.

As it has since 2004, the NEP exit poll will also include extensive telephone surveys of those planning to vote by mail to ensure that all voters are represented in Election Night coverage across the pool’s member networks and subscribers. This year, those polls will reach more than 25,000 voters casting ballots before Election Day.

For the first time in 2018, NEP’s exit poll included in-person interviews with those voting at early voting locations. The technique proved highly accurate in Nevada and Tennessee, the two states in which it was used that year, and was successfully expanded in this year’s presidential primaries in North Carolina and Texas. For the presidential election this fall, early voters will be interviewed in person in eight critical states.

“In 2018, Edison and the NEP pioneered the technique of conducting interviews at in-person early voting sites, and today, we’re using that valuable experience to expand those efforts for 2020,” said Lenski. “It’s simply a matter of taking our time-tested models and applying them to the ways people vote today.”

The 2018 exit poll also incorporated methodological improvements to better reflect the educational and age makeup of the electorate in the NEP’s results. Those improvements will be carried through to 2020. In order to make reliable, direct comparisons to the 2016 exit polls for the size of subgroups including age, education and income, the NEP members and subscribers will be using trend-adjusted results that apply the techniques added to our standard methodology in 2018 to the results from 2016.

In addition to adapting to the changing ways that voters cast their ballots, the NEP is taking precautions to ensure that voters participating in our in-person exit polls remain safe.

The NEP tasked Edison Research to conduct tests to determine best practices for safe and secure exit polls even in the midst of a major public health crisis. Exit polls will be conducted by interviewers wearing masks, who will remain six feet away from respondents and will have new, single-use pencils available for each voter filling out the exit poll questionnaire. Hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes will be available for voters to use before and after completing their exit polls.

In addition to the exit poll, the NEP and Edison Research will be tabulating the vote from all counties in the U.S. for statewide and congressional races as it has done in previous elections.

Edison Research
Joe Lenski
jlenski@edisonresearch.com

In 2018 the National Election Pool (NEP) incorporated several changes to the exit poll questionnaire and the survey weighting to help improve the accuracy of the reported size of groups by age and education in the exit polls.  The wording of the education question was changed and the education question was placed on the front side of all questionnaires.  In addition, we applied an adjustment for non-response by education and by age using parameters developed by comparing past Census estimates of turnout among these groups and past Exit Poll estimates of turnout among these groups.

The application of these changes starting in 2018 means that direct comparison of the size of voting groups by age, education, and income in 2020 cannot be made with the published survey results for those groups from 2016.  In order to allow comparisons of age, education, and income from the 2020 exit polls with those from 2016 we have applied the new age and education parameters retroactively to the 2016 surveys.  These “trend adjusted” composition numbers for age, education, and income should be used for comparison with the national survey and the twenty two states where we will have conducted state exit polls in both 2016 and 2020.

We have produced the attached spreadsheet with the trend-adjusted compositions for these demographics for the 2016 national and state surveys to be used for comparison with the 2020 exit poll results for these demographics.

To find the NEP exit poll 2016 trend-adjusted data click here

We strongly recommend when reporting on changes to the size of the electorate among age, education, income and related sub-groups in 2020 that all organizations use these trend adjusted compositions from 2016 for comparison.

For every other question we recommend that the published compositions from the 2016 exit polls should be used for comparison and trending with the 2020 exit poll results.

For the vote results among all questions including age, education, and income, the published 2016 exit poll results should still be used for comparison.

Streaming Accounts for 10% of Broadcast Radio’s Consumption during COVID-19 Disruptions

Most radio stations in the U.S. now can be heard online via a ‘stream’ in addition to over the air. Edison Research has been measuring the development of radio listening’s transition to the streaming environment ever since it began the Share of Ear® reports in 2014.

In the latest Share of Ear update done in May 2020, and amidst the disruptions caused by COVID-19, streaming hit double digits for the first time with 10% of AM/FM radio listening coming from streams versus 90% of listening on a traditional radio receiver.  The average for 2020 in total so far is 9% of listening to AM/FM audio sources coming from the streams.

The graph above shows the slow but consistent adoption of streaming as a percentage of all listening to radio station content.   

“Adoption of radio station streams continues to be slow,” said Laura Ivey, Director of Research at Edison Research.  “While it remains an area of opportunity for broadcasters, to date most people in the U.S. listen over the air when they are listening to AM/FM radio content.” Share of Ear clients can learn, among many other things, how radio fares on specific digital devices, such as smartphones, computers, internet-connected TVs, and smart speakers.   

“The statistics here represent the combination of music and spoken-word listening. Our research shows listening via streaming is higher for spoken-word radio stations such as news, public radio, talk and sports,” said Ivey, “while listening via streaming is lower for music radio stations.” 

 

Three stats to know before the release of the Latino Podcast Listener Report

by Gabriel Soto, Manager of Research

When it comes to Latinos, there is no shortage of audio consumption among our communityAs we are about to see, the same is true for podcast listening. The irony, however, is in the shortage of resources available to the Latino podcasting market. This strong consumption — paired with a lack of research – merits formal look into the podcast listening terrains of the Latino listening world. This is exactly one reason why we have teamed up with leaders in the audio space to conduct a study that will provide insights into the podcast listeners and non-listeners of our often simplified, but truly complex, ethnic group. But before we visit those terrains on June 30th, 2020, here are three statistics that demonstrate where podcast listening even stands for Latinos. 

To analyze these three listening habits that will help us contextualize podcast listening among our community of 60 million people (U.S. Census 2018 ACS Estimate) we utilize Edison Research’s Share of Ear®, a quarterly updated study that comprehensively measures daily listening in the audio space. 

The following data compares two groups, the U.S. general population ages 13+ (which includes U.S Latinos ages 13+) and a subgroup derived from the first, composed of only U.S. Latinos 13+. The term U.S. Latino refers to anyone who identified as Hispanic or Latino in the Share of Ear study. Data reflects Q1 2020 before COVID-19 disruption if any. 

1. On average, U.S. Latinos spend more time with audio each day than the U.S. population 

How much time do Latinos spend listening to audio? How big is our audio world? On average, Latinos listen to an astounding 44 more minutes of audio per day than the general population. The latter spends an average of 3 hours and 53 minutes daily with the medium, while that number skyrockets to 4 hours and 34 minutes if we only look at listening time among Latinos. In this sense, the Latino hourglass is bigger. The figure reveals the mountain of Latino audio listening and its influence on the audio market. It also indicates that Latinos have more time for all forms of audio like music and spoken word (e.g., podcasts).  

 

 

2. Latinos allocate their audio time to music vs. spoken-word audio similarly to the general population 

On our way toward examining the podcast terrains of the U.S. Latino listener, we pass by a view of music vs. spoken word audioFor a section of the audio world that has lost some ground to spoken word since 2014, music still accounts for an overwhelming 77% share for the U.S. population, leaving the remaining 23% of the listening to spoken word audio, which includes media like talk radio, news podcasts, and audiobooks—to name a fewThis split is similar when we isolate those who identify as Hispanic or Latino: over four-fifths (81%) of audio listening time goes to music while just under one-fifth (19%) goes to spoken word audio. Now although a smaller proportion of Latino audio listening goes to spoken word audio, we have to remember that Latinos spend more time with audio to begin with, so the average time spent listening to spoken word daily manages to equal what the overall population spends with this form of audio. Only by climbing this area of the Latino audio mountain can we see a clearer picture of where podcast listening stands. 

 

 

3. On average, U.S. Latinos spend more time with podcasts each day than the U.S. population 

Taking only spoken word audio listening, in others words, removing music from the equation, the U.S. total population spends about 18% of that time with podcasts. When we flip to Latinos, the proportion of this time spent with podcasts is about 22% larger, with over one-fifth (22%) of spoken word audio listening dedicated to the booming platform. 

These numbers show that Latinos retain relatively robust listening to podcasts – and more broadly – to audio overall. It is about time to begin exploring and embracing it.

 

The paradox is that Latinos invest more of their time listening to podcasts than the general U.S. population, yet investment in the Latino podcast market is thin. Imagine the potential if the podcast industry were growing and if the Latino population were growing too – oh wait, that is happening. So, for those looking to be a part of it – click here to find out more information about the upcoming U.S. Latino Podcast Listening Report. 

Edison Research’s Ask Me Anything on Digital Audio

Many thanks to those of you who joined us for our first Ask Me Anything on Digital Audio webinar! We appreciate your time and we all had a great time answering your questions and talking about the research that means so much to us.

Below is a replay of the 30-minute webinar that ended up being almost an hour. If you have more questions, we would be happy to answer them at info@edisonresearch.com.