Parenting and Household Tasks: How Dads Contribute

Based on our recent Moms on the Mother Load study, we found that moms say they are the carrier of the mental load, which includes the organizing, planning, and reminding of family tasks, but what do dads say? Data from the same survey reveals that dads contribute to household and parenting tasks in a different way, and the divisions of labor are quite clear.

To highlight the differences in responsibilities among co-parents, we used an index to compare the co-parenting dads who say they’re primarily responsible for each task against all co-parents in our sample. An index above 100 indicates that dads who co-parent are more likely than moms who co-parent to say they are primarily responsible for that task.

Household tasks
Our data shows that co-parenting dads are 79% more likely (179 index) to say they are primarily responsible for mowing the lawn than co-parenting moms.  According to dads, they are also more likely to maintain the vehicles (175 index), take the garbage out (153 index), and pay the bills (131 index).

Where do co-parenting dads index below the average?  Laundry, cleaning the house, and cooking dinner are the least likely household tasks to be primarily handled by dads. This ultimately means that all these tasks, which are done frequently and regularly, are more likely to be the responsibility of moms who co-parent.

It is interesting to note, however, how the tasks are divided.  Our research illustrates that co-parenting dads are more likely to be responsible for about half of the household tasks listed, with co-parenting moms being more likely responsible for the other half. When it comes to parenting tasks, however, this division is not as equal.

Parenting tasks
Of the 21 parenting tasks listed in the survey, including everything from making doctor’s appointments to organizing playdates, dads who co-parent reported that they are less likely than moms to be the primary person responsible for almost every task with the exception of one.  Preparing for a child to attend college (109 Index) is the only item in the list of parenting tasks where dads index above 100 and therefore means that this is sole task where dads are more likely to be responsible for than moms. Dads do index closest to the average, however, when it comes to changing diapers, exposing children to religion, and taking children to and from activities and school.

Where the household task data shows clear groups of tasks that co-parenting dads primarily do and tasks that co-parenting moms primarily do, the parenting task data does not show the same type of division. There are very few parenting tasks that co-parenting dads are more likely to report being primarily responsible for, compared to co-parenting moms.

Overall, these findings support the conclusions drawn in our Moms on the Motherload study, that even with another parent to help, co-parenting moms are the primary motors that keep the home and family running. But as society evolves and dads continue to become more involved in parenting than their own fathers were, it will be fascinating to see what the division of labor looks like in the future.

Index
Index is a measure that allows for comparison of a certain population against an average. An index of 100 represents the average. A target population has an index of 100 when it exhibits the same proportion of a characteristic as the average.

How the study was conducted
In August 2018, Edison Research conducted an online national survey of 966 parents of children age 21 and under and asked them to indicate who does what in their household and how they feel about their responsibilities.

The Return of “Relax”

by Edison Research President Larry Rosin

With the resurgence of Soft AC radio stations has come the revival of a word that had been all but banished from broadcast radio: “Relaxing.

Coming in with all the “Breeze” stations and their cousins are slogans like “Relaxing Favorites at Work,” and “Lite Relaxing Favorites.”  Stations are once again touting the “user benefit” of relaxation. 

What’s interesting about these stations grabbing hold of ‘the R word’ is that it was once heavily used by many stations, in particular those that were once the Soft ACs in their markets.  These powerhouses, now almost all positioned as “Mainstream AC” (think KOIT, WLTW, WBEB, and many others) made the move away from “relaxing” and it was almost assuredly the right thing for them to do.

Research performed that guided these stations away from “relaxing” showed convincingly that their listeners preferred both the music and the message geared around some form of “picks you up and makes you feel good.”  Music that makes the workday fly by faster.  While few people flatly rejected the word “Relaxing,” the research for these stations consistently showed they would be in a stronger place highlighting a more upbeat ‘mood service.’

It’s worth noting that ten years ago many markets also had “Smooth Jazz” stations providing relaxing music in competition with those Soft ACs.  Those are almost all long gone, meaning the “softest place on the dial” position was wide open.

The rather rapid success of some of the stations that have launched into the “relaxing”, sort of old-school Soft AC position has caught many industry observers by surprise.  Part of the success is surely related to just how far some of the “Mainstream AC” stations had traveled from any kind of relaxation mood service.  There were some people still listening to legacy brands who had been taken to a place a bit too contemporary and upbeat, and they are happy to have a place that delivers a slower pace and intensity.  Without doubt the formatics of the new Soft ACs are PPM-friendly and most launched with particularly light spot loads. 

To the above explanations I will add a further observation – maybe this is a format just made for these times.  The research work we do relating to news and opinion these days expose us to an enormous number of people who are simply exhausted by the news cycles, what they see and hear from Washington, and tense situations around the world.  People across the political spectrum are stressed out.  In blows a station called “The Breeze,” or “The Sound,” providing familiar favorites that soothe instead of stress.  Who isn’t looking for THAT kind of mood-service these days?

About Edison Research:
Edison Research conducts survey research and provides strategic information to a broad array of clients, including Activision, AMC Theatres, Disney, Dolby Laboratories, Google, Oracle, the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau, Pandora, Samsung, Siemens, Sony, The Gates Foundation, and Univision. Edison is the leading podcast research company in the world and has conducted research on the medium for NPR, Slate, ESPN, PodcastOne, WNYC Studios, and many more companies in the space.  Another specialty for Edison is its work for media companies throughout the world, conducting research in North America, South America, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe. Edison is also the leading provider of consumer exit polling and has conducted face-to-face research in almost every imaginable venue. Since 2004, Edison Research has been the sole provider of Election Day data to the National Election Pool, conducting exit polls and collecting precinct vote returns to project and analyze results for every major presidential primary and general election.

Infinite Dial 2019 Webinar

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The 2019 Infinite Dial – Save the Date

Infinite Dial title slide

Please save the date for the 2019 Edison Research/Triton Digital Infinite Dial webinar, which will take place on Wednesday, March 6th, at 2 PM Eastern. We will be streaming the results live online, and the complete presentation will be available at edisonresearch.com and tritondigital.com subsequent to the webinar.

The Infinite Dial remains the longest-running study of consumer behaviors around media and technology in America. This year, we will continue to measure a number of trends in media usage and consumption habits, particularly about streaming media, radio, mobile media consumption, and social media behaviors, and we have expanded our podcasting and smart speaker sections. Attendees will learn how the streaming audio landscape has changed, which social media platforms are growing, and how smart speaker ownership is trending. The webinar will be hosted by Tom Webster, Senior Vice President, Edison Research and John Rosso, President, Market Development of Triton Digital.

Click to register and view the Infinite Dial 2019!

In-car radio dial

“Radio” Listening Dominates Audio In-Car

As Edison Research’s Share of Ear® studies have consistently shown, when people are in their cars, it is AM/FM Radio that is the overwhelmingly dominant audio companion – -with 67% of all listening going to broadcast radio.

No matter the age of the car one is driving, this is the case. AM/FM garners a strong majority of all time spent listening in the car, even among people who drive the newest cars.

However, one can’t help but see that among those who drive the newest cars, listening to AM/FM is not quite as robust as it is among people who drive older cars.  When people have more choices, some people will, obviously, avail themselves of these new options.  And the choice that people driving newer cars seem to be making in greater numbers is SiriusXM.  As the graph below shows, among people whose principal car is model years 2015-2018 more than one-quarter of listening in the car goes to SiriusXM.

What is fascinating is if one adds together the AM/FM number and the SiriusXM number, as is shown in the graph below.  In every case, the sum of the two numbers is essentially the same.  No matter the age of the car – about seven-eighths of all listening goes to “Radio” – whether it is delivered from a satellite dish or a ‘terrestrial’ tower.

Share of Ear In Car Listening AM FM and SiriusXM

For all the discussion of new technologies in the car, such as voice activation, podcasts, and streaming, for most people and drivers of most cars, their time spent behind the wheel is taken with linear, programmed, hosted ‘radio’ type content.

For more on in-car listening, download the complete Miles Different: In-Car Audio study here.

How the Share of Ear® study is conducted:
Edison Research conducts a nationally representative study of Americans ages 13 and older to measure their time spent listening to audio sources. Respondents complete a 24-hour diary of their audio listening on an assigned day. Diaries are completed both online and by-mail using a paper diary. Diaries were completed in both English and Spanish.

About Edison Research
Edison Research conducts survey research and provides strategic information to a broad array of clients, including Activision, AMC Theatres, Disney, Dolby Laboratories, Google, Oracle, the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau, Pandora, Samsung, Siemens, Sony, The Gates Foundation, and Univision. Edison is the leading podcast research company in the world and has conducted research on the medium for NPR, Slate, ESPN, PodcastOne, WNYC Studios, and many more companies in the space.  Another specialty for Edison is its work for media companies throughout the world, conducting research in North America, South America, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe. Edison is also the leading provider of consumer exit polling and has conducted face-to-face research in almost every imaginable venue. Since 2004, Edison Research has been the sole provider of Election Day data to the National Election Pool, conducting exit polls and collecting precinct vote returns to project and analyze results for every major presidential primary and general election.