Moms and Media 2019

Moms and Media 2019

Click here to download Moms and Media 2019 

Moms and Media 2019 revealed continued interest in devices both new and old, heavy internet usage and social media engagement.

With data points drawn from the Infinite Dial® series from Edison Research and Triton Digital, the latest installment of Moms and Media shows how Moms in the United States continue to build their tech tool kit, using established devices like smartphones along with newer technologies such as smart speakers. Additionally, this year’s report illustrates how the internet is crucial to Moms’ media behaviors and consumption.

Smartphone ownership among Moms continues to rise in 2019. Powering Moms’ mobile lifestyle, this device reigns as an essential to the tech tool kit.  Showing a slight increase over last year, 94% of Moms now own a smartphone.

 

While Moms have been consuming content, engaging social media and communicating with smartphones for many years, they are showing great interest and making room in their tech tool kit for smart speakers. Just getting on Moms’ radar in the last year or so, now about one third of Moms own some type of smart speaker.

 

Within this category, the Amazon family of devices and Google Home dominate as the ones to own, with each seeing gains.

 

 

We see in 2019 more than ever that the internet is the engine of Moms’ media consumption.  Heavy users spending about 4 hours daily using the internet, Moms are not limited to just listening to online audio and using social media. Moms are invested in streaming video services like Netflix as well, and also continue their trend of watching YouTube specifically for music videos.

 

 

Pinterest continues grow in usage among Moms, showing a strong upward trend in the last few years. Back in 2017, 47% of Moms used the site and in 2018 it was more than half of Moms, at 54%. This year more than 6 in 10 Moms report using Pinterest.

 

 

Historically, Facebook has always been a major factor in Moms’ social networking. Despite the downward trend in usage among total users 12+, Facebook remains strong among Moms with 81% reporting that they currently use the site.

Where we see some Facebook fallout is for the social networking site used most. Among moms who use social networking, 64% said they use Facebook most, which is down from where it was last year at 69% and 72% in our 2017 data.

 

 

Click here to download Moms and Media 2019 

We look forward to tracking these behaviors annually as the media landscape remains fluid and Moms in America continue to integrate media and technology into their busy, mobile lifestyles.

 

 

About The Research Moms
The Research Moms are a group of experienced researchers with a specialization in understanding today’s moms. Combining a solid platform of market research with real life insight, they are a unique resource for analyzing habits, behaviors and trends among moms. Pooling their research talents from the different branches of Edison Research, they are equipped for both quantitative and qualitative studies.

About Edison Research
Edison Research conducts survey research and provides strategic information to a broad array of clients, including Activision, AMC Theatres, Disney, Dolby Laboratories, Google, Oracle, the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau, Pandora, Samsung, Siemens, Sony, The Gates Foundation, and Univision. Edison is the leading podcast research company in the world and has conducted research on the medium for NPR, Slate, ESPN, PodcastOne, WNYC Studios, and many more companies in the space.  Another specialty for Edison is its work for media companies throughout the world, conducting research in North America, South America, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe. Edison is also the leading provider of consumer exit polling and has conducted face-to-face research in almost every imaginable venue. Since 2004, Edison Research has been the sole provider of Election Day data to the National Election Pool, conducting exit polls and collecting precinct vote returns to project and analyze results for every major presidential primary and general election.

Parenting and Household Tasks: How Dads Contribute

Based on our recent Moms on the Mother Load study, we found that moms say they are the carrier of the mental load, which includes the organizing, planning, and reminding of family tasks, but what do dads say? Data from the same survey reveals that dads contribute to household and parenting tasks in a different way, and the divisions of labor are quite clear.

To highlight the differences in responsibilities among co-parents, we used an index to compare the co-parenting dads who say they’re primarily responsible for each task against all co-parents in our sample. An index above 100 indicates that dads who co-parent are more likely than moms who co-parent to say they are primarily responsible for that task.

Household tasks
Our data shows that co-parenting dads are 79% more likely (179 index) to say they are primarily responsible for mowing the lawn than co-parenting moms.  According to dads, they are also more likely to maintain the vehicles (175 index), take the garbage out (153 index), and pay the bills (131 index).

Where do co-parenting dads index below the average?  Laundry, cleaning the house, and cooking dinner are the least likely household tasks to be primarily handled by dads. This ultimately means that all these tasks, which are done frequently and regularly, are more likely to be the responsibility of moms who co-parent.

It is interesting to note, however, how the tasks are divided.  Our research illustrates that co-parenting dads are more likely to be responsible for about half of the household tasks listed, with co-parenting moms being more likely responsible for the other half. When it comes to parenting tasks, however, this division is not as equal.

Parenting tasks
Of the 21 parenting tasks listed in the survey, including everything from making doctor’s appointments to organizing playdates, dads who co-parent reported that they are less likely than moms to be the primary person responsible for almost every task with the exception of one.  Preparing for a child to attend college (109 Index) is the only item in the list of parenting tasks where dads index above 100 and therefore means that this is sole task where dads are more likely to be responsible for than moms. Dads do index closest to the average, however, when it comes to changing diapers, exposing children to religion, and taking children to and from activities and school.

Where the household task data shows clear groups of tasks that co-parenting dads primarily do and tasks that co-parenting moms primarily do, the parenting task data does not show the same type of division. There are very few parenting tasks that co-parenting dads are more likely to report being primarily responsible for, compared to co-parenting moms.

Overall, these findings support the conclusions drawn in our Moms on the Motherload study, that even with another parent to help, co-parenting moms are the primary motors that keep the home and family running. But as society evolves and dads continue to become more involved in parenting than their own fathers were, it will be fascinating to see what the division of labor looks like in the future.

Index
Index is a measure that allows for comparison of a certain population against an average. An index of 100 represents the average. A target population has an index of 100 when it exhibits the same proportion of a characteristic as the average.

How the study was conducted
In August 2018, Edison Research conducted an online national survey of 966 parents of children age 21 and under and asked them to indicate who does what in their household and how they feel about their responsibilities.

Moms on the “Mother Load” 2018

Moms on the “Mother Load,” the latest study from the Research Moms at Edison Research focuses on all the tasks that women do when they are called mom. The physical parenting responsibilities as well as the thinking, organizing and planning all contribute to the mental load that moms carry.  The report highlights not only the tasks that are managed, but also how those tasks are shared among co-parents and how moms view that division of labor.

For the full Moms on the Mother Load 2018 study click here.

Moms on the Mother Load: New Survey Results

Click here to register for our webinar with complete results from the new study, Moms on the Mother Load, this Thursday, November 29 at 2pm EST. 

This past August, Edison Research conducted an online national survey of 516 moms of children age 21 and under and asked them to indicate who does what in their household, how they feel about their responsibilities, and how much confidence they have in their child’s other parent to handle these tasks.

The survey covers not just the workload of parenting and home responsibilities but also the mental load that is required to manage a household. From planning birthday parties to making doctor appointments, find out what U.S. moms say they are responsible for, what their co-parents are responsible for, and how they feel they are handling it all.

 

Moms on the Mother Load

By Nicole Beniamini

Click here to register for our upcoming webinar with the complete results from this study, Moms on the Motherload, Thursday, November 29 at 2pm EST. 

This past August, Edison Research conducted an online national survey of 750 parents of children age 21 and under and asked them to indicate who does what in their household, how they feel about their responsibilities, and how much confidence they have in their child’s other parent to handle these tasks. The survey was asked among all mothers and fathers, but for the purpose of the Working Mother WorkBeyond Summit panel, we looked at the data among full-time working parents, or parents who work 35 hours or more in a typical week.

We asked respondents a long list of parenting tasks and had them indicate who is primarily responsible for each one – either they are, someone else is, or they share the task evenly with someone else. The data revealed that most full-time working mothers are primarily responsible for the vast majority of the tasks involving their children, such as making their kids’ doctors appointments, filling out school forms, or going shopping for their kids.  All these “invisible” tasks that working mothers are doing is also referred to as the “third shift.” Working mothers spend the first shift at the office, the second shift doing household chores, and the last shift planning and organizing for their family. When asked about the overall division of parenting tasks in their household, 81% of full-time working moms said they handle at least the majority of these tasks, with 27% saying they do all of the tasks. When we compared this data to mothers who are not currently employed, we were surprised to discover that it was exactly the same. Most moms are the “default” parent, whether they work or not.

 

Primary responsibilities Mom and Dad

 

So, we know what full-time working moms are doing but how do they feel about this mental load? It’s easy to assume that juggling home, work and family would cause these working mothers to combust, but they’re not! Among full-time working mothers, 66% say they feel confident about their parenting tasks, 60% in control and 59% organized. Among the negative adjectives, “overwhelmed” was the one that resonated most with these working mothers – with a third of working moms saying they felt that way.

Yes, working moms are carrying the mental load, but no, they aren’t necessarily overwhelmed by it.

Click here to register for our upcoming webinar with the complete results from this study, Moms on the Motherload, Thursday, November 29 at 2pm EST.