In-car radio dial

The Car is the Top Audio Listening Location

Americans love audio and make it an enormous part of their lives. In any given day, nearly everyone will consume at least some audio, and on average, people spend four hours per day listening to music, news, personalities, and sports.
Edison’s Share of Ear® study notes the location of all of this listening — and the location that people are most likely to consume audio is in the car. Seventy percent of Americans age 13 and older listen to audio in the car each day — higher even than the portion who listen to audio at home.

Car Top Audio Location

What are these people listening to? How is the in-car audio environment changing? The answers to these questions will be revealed at a session called Miles Different: In-Car Audio 2018, at 1:30pm on September 27 at the Radio Show in Orlando, produced by NAB and RAB.
 
Edison’s Larry Rosin will summarize data from Share of Ear®, Infinite Dial, and a unique tracking survey performed with NPR, to show the state of in-car audio today.

SiriusXM + Pandora = ?

This morning it was announced that satellite radio service SiriusXM will enter into an all-stock deal valued at $3.5 billion to acquire music-streaming service Pandora. The deal will create the world’s largest audio entertainment company.

The consolidation of these audio entities raises the question of what kind of share this combo will own in the total audio landscape in the United States.

For an answer, we look to Edison’s Share of Ear® study.

According to the latest Share of Ear data from Edison Research, a Pandora-SiriusXM combination would get about a 12% share of the total time spent with audio in the United States among persons 13+. Americans age 13+ spend an average of 4 hours per day consuming audio, which includes all audio sources.

SOE Pandora and Sirius

 

About Edison Research

Edison Research (www.edisonresearch.com) conducts survey research and provides strategic information to a broad array of commercial clients, governments and NGOs, including AMC Theatres, The Brookings Institution, Disney, The Gates Foundation, Google, the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau, Oracle, Pandora, The Pew Research Center, Samsung, Spotify, Sirius XM Radio, and Univision Communications. Edison Research works with many of the largest American radio ownership groups, including Bonneville, Emmis, Entercom, and Radio One. Another specialty for Edison is its work for media companies throughout the world, conducting research in North America, South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe.

Since 2004, Edison Research has been the sole provider of Election Day data to the National Election Pool, conducting exit polls and collecting precinct vote returns to project and analyze results for every major presidential primary and general election. Edison conducts more than 100,000 interviews in a single day for this project. For the 2018 and 2020 U.S. elections, Edison will provide exit polls and will tabulate the national vote across every county in the United States for ABC News, CBS News, CNN and NBC News.

Back To School

Back to School With Tech

By now, all kids are back in school and have said goodbye to summer vacation. Trying to establish new routines and reconnect with old ones is always a challenge for kids and their parents. For those of us with kids, Back-to-School could be renamed Back-to-Stress! Luckily, once everyone settles into the first month or so, daily activities normalize and life gets a little bit easier, or at least it seems to. What does not seem to get easier though, is managing kids and their use of technology. This challenge stands front and center when school is back in session.

According to data from The Research Moms, about 45% of moms agree that their children have more screen time than they would like. Finding a balance between acceptable use and overuse is difficult when technology surrounds us at home. Moms report a variety of devices and modern media adding up to screen time for their children, including televisions, smartphones, tablets, video streaming and gaming consoles. Most Moms are ok with some screen time as long as it is controlled, with 75% saying they agree that screen time is acceptable as long as limits are set on time and content.

Screen Time for Children Limits

However, controlling that time, especially for school-age children can be a bit tricky because so much homework is completed online and screen time is necessary. In many school districts, Google classroom has become a standard and take home worksheets and textbooks have been replaced with digital study guides and other online resources. Teachers are further taking advantage of technology to reach their teenage students, using smartphone apps to communicate about test prep and assignment reminders.

Moms are already familiar with their children having screen time, with 70% reporting that they have children who use the Internet every day and 57% with children who use a computer daily.

Research Moms Kids Doing Activities

Parents beware, your children may be telling the truth when they say they need their devices for homework, and instead of having less screen time during the school year, be prepared for it to be more.

Want more moms data? Come back soon for a sneak peek at a brand new 2018 study from The Research Moms. The new study includes fresh tracking data about kids and technology as well as insights about the mental load that mothers bear.

How the study was conducted:
The Research Moms conducted a national online survey of 520 mothers with children age 21 and under in June 2016.

Randy Brown VP Edison Research

Quality of Survey and Sample Design Key to AM/FM Radio Estimates

In a recent Radio World article, Edison Research’s Vice President Randy Brown tackles the topic of online-only samples versus online and offline samples, plus the difference between diary and recall methodology. Most importantly, he addresses how these differences in samples and methods can affect listenership estimates.

Speaking about the underestimation of listening to AM/FM radio, Randy says, “…if you take a closer look at how some audio research is being conducted, it should give you pause before you prepare your eulogy for AM/FM radio.”

Read the full article at Radioworld.com here.

 

In-car radio dial

Radio’s Reach In Cars Unchanged Since 2011

Edison Research, working with NPR, recently tracked the results of two previous studies performed by Edison that looked at in-car audio consumption.  As the graphic below shows, a national telephone survey of all Americans age 18 and older who have been driver or passenger in a car or truck found that in 2018, 84% currently use AM/FM Radio while driving.  Significantly, this is the exact same percentage seen in the 2011 version of this study.

 

Use AM/FM Radio In Car

 

According to Edison’s Larry Rosin, “Radio’s in-car reach remains phenomenally high and unchanged since we last updated this study in 2011.  However, this does not mean that nothing has changed in the in-car environment.  We will look at the changes we are seeing in the presentation at the Radio Show in Orlando.”

These findings, and many others will be presented in a session called “Miles Different: In-Car Audio 2018” at 1:30 PM on September 27 at the Radio Show, produced by NAB and RAB. 

Edison’s Larry Rosin will summarize data from Share of Ear®, Infinite Dial, and a unique tracking survey performed with NPR, to show the state of in-car audio today.